Care and Cleaning

How you maintain and care for your collar will ultimately affect the longevity of the piece. Proper maintenance can lead to a lifetime of wear.

First and foremost, my products are striclty ornamental and should never be used in play situations or for restraint. My products are made to stand up to normal daily wear and activity, but are not indestructable.

Familiarize yourself with the materials used in the production of your piece. Below are some helpful tips for maintaining your collar or jewelry.

  • Anodized Aluminum

I use jewelry grade anodozed aluminum. It is very lightweight (less durable than stainless steel), can be worn while bathing or swimming and is nickel free. Anodized aluminum is simply aluminum that has undergone the anodizing process (anodizing is an electrochemical process that converts the metal surface into a decorative, durable, corrosion-resistant, anodic oxide finish). This process is where the beautiful colors come from. It is important to keep the surface of the metal clean of chemicals (salt, chlorine, beauty care products, sweat and oils from the skin, etc) as these can wear down the anodized coating prematurely. I recommend regular cleanings as needed.

Caring for anodized aluminum is easy: Clean the metal using dish soap (I use Dawn) and hot water. A soft bristled brush is helpful for getting in between the rings. Please remember to always clean your collar after swimming to remove any salt or chlorine.

  • Stainless Steel

I use 316L stainless steel. 316L is ideal for jewelry and can be worn while bathing or swimming. It does contain a small amount of nickel, although this is usually not a problem for those with mild to moderate nickel sensitivities. Stainless steel is heavy and extremely durable. It is important to keep the surface of the metal clean of chemicals (salt, chlorine, beauty care products, sweat and oils from the skin, etc) as these can build up and dull the shine of the metal. I recommend regular cleanings as needed.

Caring for stainless steel is easy: Clean the metal using dish soap (I use Dawn) and hot water. A soft bristled brush is helpful for getting in between the rings. Please remember to always clean your collar after swimming to remove any salt or chlorine.

  • 925 Sterling Silver

I use 925 sterling silver. Sterling silver is heavy (less durable than stainless steel) and can be worn while bathing or swimming. Sterling silver is an alloy containing metals that react with chemicals found in air and produce tarnish; high moisture levels, exposure to sunlight and contaminants such as salt water increase this reaction. It is important to keep the surface of the metal clean of chemicals (salt, chlorine, beauty care products, sweat and oils from the skin, etc) as these can build up and oxidize the metal. Oxidation is common with sterling silver, and may produce tarnish or an 'antiqued' appearance. Most tarnish is easily removed by a polishing cloth, which I include with sterling silver pieces.

Caring for sterling silver: Soak in sterling silver safe anti-tarnish solution.  A soft bristled brush is helpful for getting in between the rings. Please remember to always clean your collar after swimming to remove any salt or chlorine

  • Ribbonmaille Chokers

Unfortunately, there is no easy way to clean these. While the metal components are safe to clean, the satin ribbon itself is a different story. Beauty care products and make up may stain or transfer onto the ribbon causing a dingy appearance. Ribbonmaille chokers should never be worn while bathing or swimming. In the event a cleaning is needed, try soaking the choker in luke warm water with a very small amount of mild laundry soap (like Woolite). Use a soft bristled brush to remove any stains, rinse thouroughly and allow to dry completely before wearing again.

  • Nickel Plated Padlocks

These are the only plated items that I carry. Nickel plated items should not be worn while bathing or swimming. Nickel plated items will degrade over time and will need to be replaced every so often. I am not responsible for this occurance, as it is just the nature of nickel plating.